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The Westchester County School Reopening Workgroup has released an eight-page “Frequently Asked Questions” guide that will assist the County’s school districts in addressing the health, COVID-19 and contact tracing requirements for their schools to reopen safely this fall.

The Workgroup was created to provide a direct link between the County’s health and facilities departments to school administrators, staff, faculty, students and families as they prepare for the start of the school year. The Workgroup is co-chaired by Joseph Glazer, Deputy Commissioner of the Department of Community Mental Health, and Joseph Ricca, White Plains School Superintendent, and President of the Lower Hudson Council of School Superintendents.

Westchester County Executive George Latimer said: “The most important thing for all of us is to create a safe and effective plan to best educate our students this fall. I am proud of the fast and efficient guidance the County and this working group has provided to assist our school district with making this a reality. By creating these FAQ’s, we are serving the proper role of government – assisting those who fall within our mandate of public service.”

The FAQ’s are part of a larger effort by the Workgroup, which has already provided four workshops and answered dozens of questions from school officials and medical staff.

Glazer said: “The Workgroup wants to help the schools the best we can. We created the FAQ’s by asking school superintendents across the County to share the major questions they had as they put together their reopening plans. Working with the staff in the County Executive’s Office, and the doctors and public health professionals in the County’s Health Department, we complied answers to their specific questions.”

Ricca said: “The health and safety of our children and community members is paramount. It is a true pleasure to work alongside the committed professionals in Westchester County to provide the strongest support possible as we move through the on-going challenges associated with the COVID-19 pandemic.”